TechWhirl: Technical Communication Recap for August 9, 2013

technical communication recap for July 5This week we mix in a little “original programming” with one of the great hallmarks of summer (at least in the U.S.)—time for some summer reruns. If you missed it the first time around, check out our most popular April Fools’ Day article ever. Join in our unofficial renaming of our industry by voting in this week’s poll and commenting as you see fit. And then see what everyone else is talking about in tech comm and content management with Tech Writer This Week.

Join the growing crowd—consider writing for TechWhirl as a member of the Special Writers Unit. To get in touch, just drop us a note and let us know what kinds of topics you’re most interested. And don’t forget to stop by the email discussion list for helpful, interesting, and occasionally cantankerous viewpoints on all things tech comm.

Have a great weekend!

-Connie and the gang at TechWhirl

 Tech Writer This Week

Tech Writer This Week for August 8, 2013

Our weekly recap of the best Technical Communications and Content Management writing on the web.

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Yahoo CEO Bans Technical Writers from Working at Office

Enjoy this summer rerun of one of our best April Fools’ Day articles: The CEO of Yahoo! recently upset a lot of people when she announced that employees would no longer be allowed to work from home, and that all returning employees were going to be put on rotating babysitting duty. However, the public outcry seems to have ignored one of the more puzzling details – technical writers are officially exempt from this new work requirement.

 My Name is _ web _ feature

What is the Name of Our Industry? (Poll)

What do you call the industry of companies who produce goods and provide services that help a organization manage its content?

 

Connie Giordano

Connie Giordano is a partner in INKtopia Limited and editor of TechWhirl's Tech Writer Today online magazine. She has been a list member and contributor since the days when 14,400 baud was high speed communications, and Windows 95 was state-of-the-art.

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