Tech Writer This Week for Sept. 5, 2015

phonebooth-nightlights

With the arrival of September comes the autumn rush… that season which defies the laws of physics by putting more work in front of us than we have time to complete, much less consider thoughtfully. For us here at TechWhirl, we hurl ourselves headlong at a schedule that includes all the normal stuff, plus conferences and events, and a host of unexpected occurences that give new meaning to the phrase “all-nighter.” Having long since passed by the undergraduate days where the energy to handle such projects was normal, we frequently long for a few superpowers to help us navigate the vortex.

With x-ray vision, we could see through walls, and figure out who’s responsible for that cut-and-paste version of the manual for the latest release. With the ability to fly at supersonic speeds, we could attend ALL the conferences that intrigue us. If we were invisible, we could sit in on the PHB meetings where they decide the budget for personnel and tools for next year, bopping the naysayers on the head as needed. And if we could leap tall buildings in a single bound, then the challenges of the daily commute would be history.

Alas, I haven’t found an app for that (if you have please let us know–we’d love to review it here on TechWhirl). And, going mobile produced at least one unintended consequence. . . the disappearance of phone booths as we knew them means the opportunities for transformation are a lot more limited than they used to be.

We can, however, continue our pledge to find and deliver thoughtful, powerful stuff from the superheros, the leaders and practitioners who show us how to better use the powers we do have, and avoid the hidden deposits of kryptonite:

Holy content and communication, Batman! Find more superheroic posts curated in the latest edition of Tech Writer This Week.

Connie Giordano

Connie Giordano is a partner in INKtopia Limited and editor of TechWhirl's Tech Writer Today online magazine. She has been a list member and contributor since the days when 14,400 baud was high speed communications, and Windows 95 was state-of-the-art.

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