Michael Munkvold

Michael Munkvold is a graduate of Portland State University’s Technical Writing Master’s program. He has been a journalist and technical writer/editor for a number of years, having written for such publications as Flossin’ Magazine, beportland.com, Into the Woods and the Institute for Sustainable Solutions. You can connect with Michael on his Facebook and Google+ pages.

Fear Itself

The creature lurched toward him. Richard felt another fit coming on; this was like living in one of his many nightmares. His heart pounding, Richard bolted into the car and slammed the door. It didn’t lock all the way, however, and Richard watched in slow-motion horror as the thing grabbed the door handle and forced itself halfway inside the car. Continue reading ...

volunteer

How to Use Volunteering to Get a Job in Technical Writing

One year ago, I graduated from Portland State University with a Master’s in Technical Writing, and set out into the world, sure that a career as a professional writer was within my grasp. Then reality showed its ugly head – I was going into the expertise-heavy world of technical writing with a piece of paper and little practical experience. Every job listing included the soul-killing phrase “5-10 years of experience preferred”. Continue reading ...

Robot icon for Maker Faire

Makers of the World Unite: Tech Comm, Art, and the Maker Movement

In every age of scientific exploration, there have been stories of the everyman inventor, the humble pioneer who changed the world while working from scratch. The 19th century had Pierre and Marie Curie, while the 20th century had the stories of Alexander Fleming and Bill Gates. The 21st century may well tell the story of the “maker movement”, a subculture of inventors, engineers and scientists who create everything from open source software programs to personal robots in their spare time and with their own materials. This century may be the age of the invention community - ordinary people sharing the simple joy of creating something with their own two hands with a worldwide network of their fellow inventors. Continue reading ...