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Technical Communication Job Summary December 16, 2012

Traditionally December has been a slow period for recruiting in the Technical Communication industry. December, 2012 is bucking this trend with a slew of Technical Communication roles being advertised. These roles span all industries, locations, experience levels and also specialty. Continue reading ...

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Technical Communication Job Summary December 2, 2012

Technical Communication industry jobs can be found in all cities across America and the world. Most large organizations have subsidiaries in other states, separate from their headquarters location. For example, eBay, headquartered in San Jose, California, has an office in Salt Lake City, Utah where they house many technical writers and instructional designers. Continue reading ...

volunteer

How to Use Volunteering to Get a Job in Technical Writing

One year ago, I graduated from Portland State University with a Master’s in Technical Writing, and set out into the world, sure that a career as a professional writer was within my grasp. Then reality showed its ugly head – I was going into the expertise-heavy world of technical writing with a piece of paper and little practical experience. Every job listing included the soul-killing phrase “5-10 years of experience preferred”. Continue reading ...

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Technical Communication Job Summary November 18, 2012

Technical Communication jobs span all industries. When you are looking for your next role, don’t forget to look at possibilities in the not-for-profit, academic, defense and government industries. You never know you could align your volunteering (yes, Technical Communicators do volunteer and benefit from doing so) with your next job. Continue reading ...

freelancing rates

Freelancing: Are You Ready to Make the Leap? Part 2

Part 2 of deciding whether to make the freelancing rate discusses one of the most challenging areas of freelancing—how to set your rate—and gives some examples to work with. You have two primary ways of charging your clients: by project and by hour. They each have their pros and cons and I actually suggest a combination of the two. Continue reading ...